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NEW  PUBLICATION

WHEN THE LUCK RUNS OUT:
AUSTRALIA'S FAILURE TO PREPARE FOR CLIMATE DISPLACEMENT

Australia is a country disproportionately responsible for CO2 emissions on a per capita basis. When contrasted with other nations Australia has been slower than all other OECD countries to take effective action to reduce its emissions.

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THE PENINSULA PRINCIPLES
AT 10 – OFFERING SOLUTIONS FOR A DECADE

​Since their approval on 18 August 2013, the Peninsula Principles on Climate Displacement Within States have had a major impact across many sectors involved in climate displacement matters. Translated into fifteen languages and distributed widely, the Principles have been repeatedly referred to at the UN and other organs of the international community as a leading normative source of guidance for governments and civil society seeking to prevent and address climate displacement. 

 

Now, some ten years after their emergence, the Peninsula Principles remain more needed than ever as climate threats worsen with each passing year.

 

Estimates of how many people will face climate displacement made in 2013 now seem wishful thinking, with current projections routinely topping more than one billion people who will need to move as the effects of climate change further take root. 

In 2023, Displacement Solutions and our partners and associates around the world are commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Principles. We are again urging governments, the UN and civil society at all levels to re-visit the Principles and apply with the vigour they require to protect everyone against displacement caused by climate change.

 

The Peninsula Principles comprise 18 fundamental principles, formulated into three categories – pre-displacement, mid-displacement and post-displacement – all grounded in pre-existing international human rights laws. They are designed to assist governments to better protect the housing, land and property rights of people and communities affected by climate displacement and to empower these same people and communities to formulate their demands for climate justice in ways fully consistent with their rights under human rights law and the obligations incumbent on governments to respect, protect and fulfil them.